Aquaculture Science Hub

Seaweed and Mussel Aquaculture as Habitat

A fish swims through a seaweed farm in Belize.
Aquaculture as Habitat A fish hangs out in Mariko Wallen and Louis Godfrey's seaweed farm in Placencia, Belize. This farm grows two species: Eucheuma (for consumption) and Gracilaria (used for skin treatments and cosmetics). The farm is part of a program sponsored by TNC to bring seaweed aquaculture to the area in cooperation with the Placencia Fishermen Cooperative. © Randy Olson

Restorative aquaculture may be one of the best opportunities to simultaneously restore marine ecosystems and provide nutritious food for current and future populations. When done well and in the right places seaweed aquaculture can provide habitat, for fish and other animals to shelter, feed and reproduce

In this video, experts and farmers from Maine and New Zealand discuss the potential habitat benefits of seaweed aquaculture as habitat, as part of TNC's partnership with the University of New England and the University of Auckland.

Seaweed Aquaculture as Habitat In partnership with the University of New England and University of Auckland, The Nature Conservancy is researching the role of seaweed aquaculture as habitat, and what drives this role so that restorative aquaculture can be developed in geographies across the world.